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Schwab does not receive payment to promote any particular ETF to its customers. Their price and investment return will fluctuate with market conditions and interest rates. The main benefit to purchasing commodities through ETFs or mutual funds is simplicity.

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Thumbs up / down votes are submitted voluntarily by readers and are not meant to suggest the future performance or suitability of any account type, product or service for any particular reader and may not be representative of the experience of other readers.

Investment value will fluctuate, and shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than original cost. Some ETFs appearing on this List may be subject to expense reimbursements and waivers, and less such reimbursements and waivers may have lower total annual operating expenses i.

Please read the fund prospectus carefully to determine the existence of any expense reimbursements or waivers and details on their limits and termination dates. An exchange processing fee applies to sell transactions. Schwab reserves the right to change the ETFs we make available without commissions.

All ETFs are subject to management fees and expenses. Please see the Charles Schwab Pricing Guide for additional information. Investors should consider carefully information contained in the prospectus, or if available, in the summary prospectus including investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses.

You can request a prospectus by calling Please read it carefully before investing. Mentions of individual stocks in the ETF descriptions section are for illustrative purposes only and are not a recommendation to buy, hold or sell any specific security. Many Fixed-income securities are subject to increased loss of principal during periods of rising interest rates. Fixed-income investments are subject to various other risks, including changes in credit quality, market valuations, liquidity, prepayments, early redemption, corporate events, tax ramifications and other factors.

The lower-rated securities in which some bond funds invest are subject to greater credit risk, default risk and liquidity risk. Investment returns will fluctuate and are subject to market volatility, so that an investor's shares, when redeemed or sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Shares are bought and sold at market price, which may be higher or lower than the net asset value NAV. Third-party ETF sponsors or their affiliates participating in ETF OneSource pay Schwab an asset-based fee which applies only to ETF shares acquired without a commission charge and a fixed program fee each year for recordkeeping, shareholder services, and other administrative services that Schwab provides to participating ETFs.

The asset-based fee varies among ETFs and can be as high as 0. Schwab does not receive payment to promote any particular ETF to its customers. The amount of the fees is disclosed in the prospectus of each ETF. Government bond fund shares are not guaranteed. Their price and investment return will fluctuate with market conditions and interest rates.

Shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost. International investments involve additional risks, which include differences in financial accounting standards, currency fluctuations, political instability, foreign taxes and regulations, and the potential for illiquid markets. Investing in emerging markets may accentuate these risks. Risks of REITs are similar to those associated with direct ownership of real estate, such as changes in real-estate values and property taxes, interest rates, cash flow of underlying real-estate assets, supply and demand, and the management skill and creditworthiness of the issuer.

Since a sector fund is typically not diversified and focuses its investments on companies involved in a specific sector, the fund may involve a greater degree of risk than an investment in other mutual funds with greater diversification.

Small-cap funds are subject to greater volatility than those in other asset categories. High-yield funds invest in lower-rated securities. This subjects these funds to greater credit risk, default risk and liquidity risk. Some specialized exchange-traded funds can be subject to additional market risks.

Commodity-related products, including futures, carry a high level of risk and are not suitable for all investors. Commodity-related products may be extremely volatile, illiquid and can be significantly affected by underlying commodity prices, world events, import controls, worldwide competition, government regulations, and economic conditions, regardless of the length of time shares are held. Investments in commodity-related products may subject the fund to significantly greater volatility than investments in traditional securities and involve substantial risks, including risk of loss of a significant portion of their principal value.

No mention of particular funds or fund families here should be construed as a recommendation or considered an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any securities.

This information provided here is for general informational purposes only and should not be considered an individualized recommendation or personalized investment advice. The securities listed may not be suitable for everyone. Each investor needs to review a securities transaction for his or her own particular situation.

Schwab or its employees may sometimes hold positions in the securities listed here. Data contained here is obtained from what are considered reliable sources; however, its accuracy, completeness or reliability cannot be guaranteed. Charles Schwab Investment Management, Inc. RA is the owner of certain intellectual property. The names identifying the Bloomberg Barclays' indices are trademarks and service marks of Bloomberg Finance L.

The Index Sponsors do not accept any obligations or liability in relation to the issuance, marketing, operation or trading of the Schwab ETFs. Indexes are the intellectual property of their providers. ETF sponsors generally enter into licensing agreements with index providers.

Get an ETF Quote. Comments are updated quarterly. Data source identification Investors should consider carefully information contained in the prospectus, or if available, in the summary prospectus including investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses.

Index covers over U. Holds approximately of the largest U. Provides diversified exposure to large U. Mid-cap growth style index. Main sectors are industrials, technology, and financialsMid-cap growth style index.

Main sectors are industrials, technology, and financials. Mid-cap value style index. Main sectors are financials, consumer goods, and consumer servicesMid-cap value style index.

Main sectors are financials, consumer goods, and consumer services. Includes over 1, companies and tries to capture the performance of U. The fund tries to match the performance of a diversified group of small growth companiesThe fund tries to match the performance of a diversified group of small growth companies. The fund tries to match the performance of a diversified group of small value companiesThe fund tries to match the performance of a diversified group of small value companies.

Provides exposure to domestic small-cap equities selected through a multi-factor model and equally weightedProvides exposure to domestic small-cap equities selected through a multi-factor model and equally weighted. Stocks are selected based on company fundamentals: When choosing an broker to open a trading account with, always be mindful of fees. There is a minimum balance requirement you must meet in order to trade commodities on most platforms.

At some brokerage firms this can be as much as ten-thousand dollars. Check with your broker to find out how much you will need to deposit. Many brokers require a confirmation of an investor's experience before opening an account to trade commodity futures and options. Most brokers have completely online registration that simply involve filling out information, and then funding the account with money from your bank account.

You can also download the forms, complete the information, and then mail it back to the brokerage firm. Wait for approval from the brokerage firm. Select a mutual fund or ETF to purchase. There are thousands of available products to accomplish this. To determine which is right for you, you need to ask yourself what your goals are.

For example, do you want exposure to all commodities as a way to diversify your portfolio? If you are looking for broad exposure to many commodities, consider ETFs that contain a small sample of every commodity. These funds each contain many commodities,and are good ways to gain access to the entire commodity market. Alternatively, doing a google search for the name of the commodity you want to invest in, followed by the word ETF can yield many examples of ETFs to consider.

Once your brokerage account is opened, and you have selected a product you want, you can proceed to purchase. While the exact procedure varies between brokers, the basic process remains similar. Start by opening a new order. Once an order is open, enter the ticker symbol for the investment you want to buy. Google the name of the ETF to locate the ticker symbol.

Once you enter the symbol, you will need to enter the amount of units you want to buy. To determine this, you need to know how much money you want to invest.

At this point, click "buy", and you will own units of the ETF. Learn about futures contracts. Futures contracts are the main way commodities are directly traded, and this is a highly risky and sophisticated means of owning commodities.

Therefore, this is only recommended for advanced investors and traders. Contracts are generally in standardized units. For example, a standard contract for Brent Crude Oil is for barrels. There are also "mini" contracts available for barrels. You could then sell the more valuable contract before the due day to earn a profit.

Realize the risks before purchasing futures contracts. Futures contracts are very risky, which is why amateur traders should not use them without extensive research. Futures involve something called buying on margin.

This means you only pay a small portion of the value of the contract, with the rest being borrowed. This depends on your broker and the investments made. If you have the knowledge, you can use futures to trade a commodity you are interested in.

To do this, you will need to find a broker that offers futures trading. Many brokers that offer ETFs and mutual funds often offer futures trading.

You will need to select the type of commodity you wish to purchase, and then you will need to select the month in which the contract expires, as well as the number of contracts you wish to purchase. Most brokers have drop down menu's with the various dates, contract amounts, and commodities available.

You simply need to select the options you want, and then click buy. Learn about futures options. Futures options are another type of investment that adds another level of complexity to futures contracts. Whereas futures allows an investor to simply buy or sell a contract to make or take delivery of a commodity, options trading gives an investor an option to buy or sell a specific futures contract to make or take delivery of a identified commodity at a set price in the future.

These options allow traders to respond to market changes. A put option gives them the right but not the obligation to sell a future contract. If this seems confusing, that's because it is. Many financial professional advise that individual investors, especially inexperienced ones, stay away from options investing entirely. Understand the risk and benefits of futures options. Futures options are primarily used for two purposes: Both come with unique sets of benefits and potential risks.

Speculation with futures options is essentially the same as speculating on any other security, with one big difference. With a normal speculative investment, you are simply betting that the price of a security will rise. With a futures option, you are projecting that the price of a commodity will rise or fall in excess of the option strike price within a specific time period. This makes this type of speculation incredibly difficult.

Unlike other investments, options have a limited life and most expire without being exercised. Investors do not own anything but a right to buy or sell for a limited period of time. Hedging, the other use for futures options, is considerably less risky. Essentially, hedging through futures options is an insurance policy for your current investments.

You could, for example, purchase a put option such that you could sell off your investment and minimize your losses in the event of an unexpected drop in that asset's price.

If you've decided to purchase futures options, you can likely do so with your current broker. Many online brokerages offer futures options trading. Be sure to check with your broker to be sure that you stay in line with any specific requirements for options trading.

Even though put options require that you sell a commodity contract, you don't necessarily have to own this contract to buy the option. Not Helpful 2 Helpful 3. Any broker can tell you the current prices. Also consult any of various financial websites, such as Bloomberg. Not Helpful 2 Helpful 2. If there was no insurance, and the shipper takes no responsibility, your incur a loss.

Not Helpful 3 Helpful 2. Is it necessary to sell commodities purchased within a stipulated time? Or can I keep it for a longer period? If so, what is the time limit? Not Helpful 3 Helpful 1. A broker charges a fee for his service.